// Richard Hart / Hates_

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annoyances

The Internet is a Shit Hole

annoyances, internet

Recently I’ve been teaching a person older than me (60+) how to use a computer for the first time as well as how to get to grips with using the internet and email. While it’s been a test of all my patience, one thing is for sure, that trying to show someone how to search for something is a nightmare because every result is filled with ads and filler, and more than half the time the actual content doesn’t start until way below the fold. Just imagine how crazy that is for someone who is still struggling to use the scrollbar!

After so many years of using the internet, you learn to just filter out all the noise and just quickly scann each page to see if it’s relevant or not, but sitting with someone new to all of this is staggering. They just don’t know what they’re looking at or where to even go for what they really want. Search results are down the pan and content providers are just optimising for revenue. Content sites are 90% filler and nothing but subtle attempts to direct you to other pages.

The internet is just a ghetto full of shit.

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‘FBML’ [undefined] is not an object

annoyances, programming

First let me state how much I dislike developing for the Facebook platform. It’s just one constant headache. Things are always changing and breaking things. Anyways, I’ve been banging my head against the wall all day trying to get some FBJS running on a canvas application that’s embedded on a Fan Page tab. No matter what I did, I kept getting the error:


    'FBML' [undefined] is not an object.

Even using Facebook’s own FBJS examples left my tab in a hung state, with the spinner just continuing forever. After hours of playing around, the problem is that I’m trying to use Javascript one page deep into the application (The landing page itself has no FBJS). Once I added an opening and closing script tag to the landing page, my FBJS woes vanished.


    <script>
      <!--
      //-->
    </script>
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Skype on OSX

annoyances, computing

There’s just something about the way Skype looks on OSX that really bugs me. I can’t tell what it is, but the UI just feels really intrusive. Then again, it’s probably not supposed to be kept visible like I do with my contact list in Adium, which has a brilliant transparent and borderless option.

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Customer Service

annoyances, business

I suffered some pretty poor service when I returned to JEM Ltd to have the faulty valve fixed. I won’t go into details but here are what I think are ways of offering good customer service:

Apologise

Whether or not a customer’s complaint is valid and even not your fault. Just say sorry and try to understand where the customer is coming from. At rather then just being told “We’re really sorry, we’ll do our best to help.” they tried to wriggle out of having anything to do with the problem. Although a short term win for them, I’ll never be returning and will be making sure I make it known to anyone I can to never go there. Any short term loss involved with rectifying my problem would be repaid through repeat business and word of mouth about the quality of service. Washing your hands of a customer’s problems is not a recipe for success.

Listen

When a customer is angry, don’t point it out, you’ll only make them more angry. Saying things like “Before you get angry” or “If you’ll just calm down” will only infuriate them more. I’m not normally one to get angry and wasn’t at the time, but wow, did this push me over the edge. People get angry when they fell like they aren’t being listened to. Shouting is a way of making yourself heard. So if a customer is shouting at you, double your efforts to listen to them. As corny as it is, God gave us two ears and one mouth for a reason.

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If I was Microsoft

annoyances, business, computing, mac, microsoft

Microsoft recently started their new ad campaign where seemingly normal people try to buy a new computer. They’re given a budget and if they find one that fills their requirements, they can keep it.

The first advert follows Lauren with a budget of $1000. She wants a laptop that’s fast, has a comfortable keyboard and a 17” screen. On her quest for a laptop she visits the Apple store and comes out saying they are over her budget and that she’s just not cool enough to be a Mac person. She has no trouble finding a suitable laptop in regular electronics store and ends up purchasing a HP Pavilion. The second advert follows Giampaolo with a slightly bigger budget of $1500. He wants a laptop that’s portable, has good battery life and power. Once again there is a poke at Apple. This time they are more about aesthetics rather then power and that he doesn’t want to be paying for a brand. And once again he ends up with a HP Pavilion (Oh, HP, that’ll be the brand you just paid for then).

My problem with the adverts isn’t the poke at Apple, but rather they are promoting a non-message. If I’m going out to buy a new computer and I don’t want a Mac or want a Mac but don’t want to save for it, I have no choice but to buy a PC. I can’t see them swaying the people who have made the choice to switch and have the money ready to buy a Mac. So who are these adverts aimed at? There’s no competition in the sub $1500-$2000 range, so is it even worth doing at all. Honda make ads to stand out amongst Toyota, Ford etc. They don’t make adverts in the hope that they’ll stop people that are thinking of splashing out on an expensive sports car, and sway them to settle for a Civic instead. This and the previous ”I’m a PC” series of adverts just end up legitimising Apple’s presence. Apple is a tiny dog biting at the heels of a giant, yet Microsoft feel like they need to gear their entire consumer TV advertising campaign to take them on. The campaign may well be just insurance for Microsoft. How many heads would roll if they decided to ignore Apple completely, or not even bother advertising to consumers, and then their market share tanked. Perhaps it’s better to appear to do something, then to not do anything at all. On the other hand though, could all that money be better spent doing something else.

All of which leads me onto what I would do if I was Microsoft. Simply, I would advertise Windows 7 and IE8. I’d give people hope once again in Microsoft products (Hopefully the products would match the hype). But I’d ram it down people’s throats day and night. “Forget what you thought about Vista, Windows 7 is coming”. “Experience the web like you’ve never done before. IE8 has arrived”. That sort of stuff.

Perhaps that’s what I find so alluring about the “Apple way”. When you see them in use, you feel like you’re being taken to a time and place beyond the normal preconceptions of how technology works. Microsoft used to have that. Microsoft used to ask “Where do you want to go today?”, with the promise of taking you there, no matter how far fetched your dreams were. Now they just state “Your potential. Our passion.”, which leaves you with the sinking feeling that really over the years a massive void has grown between us and them.

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