// Richard Hart / Hates_

Move fast and break things

computing, life

I was thinking about the “Move fast and break things” approach to projects this morning. A few projects I’m currently working have been moving at a snails pace and the longer projects go on and the bigger they get before being launched fills me a certain kind of dread. I feel really comfortable launching with a few half baked features rather than everything in one big bang. When there are so many moving parts in a launch, no matter how much you test, real users are going to find problems, and trying to keep on top of them can drive you insane. It’s the difference between trying to steer a small sail boat vs a cruise liner. If you start small you can probably respond quickly to change and get to where you want to go than if you launch big and try and change course later on.

Now I don’t condone breaking things, but I do agree with the idea of moving fast and staying agile. So just “Move fast”, that’s all you have to do. Accept that things will break and things will need improving.

“A good plan violently executed now is better than a perfect plan executed next week.” – George S. Patton

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Generate a random email address in TextExpander

apple, computing, osx

Made this short snippet to help generate random email addresses using TextExpander. Set the snippet content type to “Shell Script” and paste in the following. You’ll need Ruby installed which comes with most modern versions of OSX.

The snippet will generate a different address every minute and copy it to your local clipboard incase you want to paste it in again. It also uses YOPMail which you can check for emails too.


#!/usr/bin/env ruby -U
email = "#{Time.now.strftime("%m%d%H%M")}@yopmail.com"
IO.popen('pbcopy', 'w') {|io| io.write(email)}
print email
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Hard Deadlines

annoyances, programming

On almost every single project I’ve worked on, hard deadlines have nearly always been the cause of any stress or frustration that arises. One day you’re asked to make rough estimates and then next thing you know they become pegged to a date in the future that you must meet at all cost (But you said you think it would only take X days!). Even worse is when someone non-technical makes the estimates for you and passes them down from on high (Look, this is the all the time we have, I’m sure you’ll be fine!).

Why do we still insist on having hard deadlines? Yeah I know, we asked for more features but now the project is “late” so you’ve failed to do your job. Yet, if the deadline wasn’t concrete, the project would have more features then initially scoped and delivered in a timely fashion, you’re a success!

New features are always requested, changes are always wanted and bugs will always be found. If everyone just accepted (understood) that writing software isn’t exact science then we’d all have a lot less stress to deal with and we can stop feeling like a failure for not meeting that pie-in-the-sky deadline.

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Cake

life

Two people want to share a cake. The reasonable person asks for half the cake, the unreasonable person asks for the whole cake. They compromise and split the difference – the unreasonable person gets three quarters of the cake and the reasonable person gets a quarter.

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House Prices are Rising Fast Again

housing

“The thing that is different about this bubble from the last one in 2006/2007 (and I use this word intentionally) is the sheer nervousness out there. Nobody aside from estate agents is actually excited about the rise – people are confused, and some are angry, and most people don’t understand what is happening. There is much more widespread acceptance that this cannot go on, and widespread confusion as to where buyers are actually getting their money from.”

Everyone constantly asks “Why don’t you get a mortgage?” and 99% of the time the people who ask are either those who bought during the early 80s or already own a property. Does no one see the ridiculousness of the current property market in London? Every day there is another article that talks of a looming bubble and the potential for a housing disaster.

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